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Hamilton Hoppin House Comes Out Of The Shadows

Updated: Oct 22, 2021



Middletown/Newport


Perhaps one of Newport County’s most hidden jewels, Villa 120 at Hamilton Hoppin House is finally ready to come out of the shadows and reclaim its rightful place of prominence in the storied world of Newport mansions.


Though it might be a stones-throw across the line in beautiful Middletown, the Hamilton Hoppin House, with its unique charm, has a story like no other in Newport County.


Built before the Civil War in 1856 as a summer residence for Hamilton Hoppin of New York, patriarch of a prominent Rhode Island family, this three-story, wood framed building designed in a transitional Italianate-Stick style by noted 19th Century architect Richard Upjohn, the Hamilton Hoppin House, also known then as “Villalon” is a National Historic landmark, as the first mansion in the Newport area should be.


It is also one of few houses of its kind that has been continuously used as a small hotel (and now a stylishly restored 8-bedroom Bed & Breakfast).

Though it has seen the passing of time and the growth of Newport into a world-class destination, “Shadow Lawn” as it was called for many years due to the cloistered nature and quiet contemplative retreat from the hustle-bustle of Newport, has new ownership that is determined to take Villa 120 at Hamilton Hoppin House to new prominence in Newport County’s hospitality industry.


Led by local attorney and developer Ben Cerilli, who pioneered the time-share industry in Newport when he purchased and developed Shamrock Cliff (now Ocean Cliff), Mr. Cerilli and his team are determined to continue to operate the Villa as “an upscale, unique and historic Bed & Breakfast”, with guests currently enjoying free limo service, a full breakfast, private chef dinners and other amenities, with an eye toward expanding operations to include “intimate events including weddings, rehearsal dinners, corporate events, lectures and other upscale events.”


There are also plans to expand on the over-sized 64,032 square foot parcel.

According to Mr. Cerilli “we have engaged John Grosvenor of Newport Collaborative Architects to explore expansions, keeping within the framework of the unique, historical nature of the building.”

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